Frequently asked questions (FAQ) about garlic

Frequently asked questions (FAQ) about garlic

Q: What happens when garlic turns green or blue during pickling or
cooking?
A:According to Food Network at www.foodtv.com (published in the Rocky
Mountain news 2/20/2002), looked into the reason pickled garlic sometimes turns blue. Garlic contains anthocyanins, water-soluble
pigments that turn blue or purple in an acid solution. While this color
transformation tends to occur more often with immature garlic, it can
differ among cloves within the same head of garlic. The garlic flavor
remains unchanged, and it totally edible without bodily harm.

On the same subject, our friend, Bob Anderson, explains that garlic
contains sulfur compounds which can react with copper to form copper
sulfate, a blue or blue-green compound. The amount of copper needed for
this reaction is very small and is frequently found in normal water
supplies. Raw garlic contains an enzyme that if not inactivated by
heating reacts with sulfur (in the garlic) and copper (from water or
utensils) to form blue copper sulfate. The garlic is still safe to eat.

Garlic exposed to direct sunlight can also turn green and acquire a
bitter taste.